Co Education Is Good Or Bad Essay Comments

  • Think about it...

    Many people say that if the other sex is in the other room, the other will not pay attention towards their education.
    Co-ed setting could intimidate the opposite sex and that could affect the student's participation skills.
    The University of Pennsylvania researchers randomly placed the students in single-sex classrooms and a study showed that the students said they would go attend 4 years of college.
    For those in a single-sex environment, social interactions with the other sex outside of school offer the chance to develop these communication skills, so single-sex schools may better.
    The appearance of the sex might be different. The dress code would have a major change because the other sex wouldn’t be in the classroom so they wouldn’t get “distracted”
    Research has shown that girls perform better in school in warm rooms while boys perform better in cooler rooms. Having a warm room could affect the other genders participation and their grade. Single sex school would be able to adjust the temperature to help students get a better education
    Some research and reports from educators suggest that single-sex education can broaden the educational prospects for both girls and boys. Co-ed schools tend to reinforce gender stereotypes, while single-sex schools can break down gender stereotypes. For example, girls are free of the pressure to compete with boys in male-dominated subjects such as math and science. Boys, on the other hand, can more easily pursue traditionally “feminine” interests such as music and poetry. One mother, whose daughter has attended a girls-only school for three years, shared her experience on the GreatSchools parent community: “I feel that the single gender environment has given her a level of confidence and informed interest in math and science that she may not have had otherwise.”
    School Dash research found that 75% of students that attend single-sex schools achieved at least 5 good GCSEs compared to the 55% of students that attend mixed schools
    Single sex schools enable girls and boys to feel free to learn and discover any subject, with girls able to pursue interest in male-dominated subjects such as maths and science and boys able to explore music and the arts. Indeed, at the 26 Girls’ Day School Trust schools and academies, girls are more than twice more likely to opt for science or engineering degrees at university level than girls nationally.

  • Think about it...

    Many people say that if the other sex is in the other room, the other will not pay attention towards their education.
    Co-ed setting could intimidate the opposite sex and that could affect the student's participation skills.
    The University of Pennsylvania researchers randomly placed the students in single-sex classrooms and a study showed that the students said they would go attend 4 years of college.
    For those in a single-sex environment, social interactions with the other sex outside of school offer the chance to develop these communication skills, so single-sex schools may better.
    The appearance of the sex might be different. The dress code would have a major change because the other sex wouldn’t be in the classroom so they wouldn’t get “distracted”
    Research has shown that girls perform better in school in warm rooms while boys perform better in cooler rooms. Having a warm room could affect the other genders participation and their grade. Single sex school would be able to adjust the temperature to help students get a better education
    Some research and reports from educators suggest that single-sex education can broaden the educational prospects for both girls and boys. Co-ed schools tend to reinforce gender stereotypes, while single-sex schools can break down gender stereotypes. For example, girls are free of the pressure to compete with boys in male-dominated subjects such as math and science. Boys, on the other hand, can more easily pursue traditionally “feminine” interests such as music and poetry. One mother, whose daughter has attended a girls-only school for three years, shared her experience on the GreatSchools parent community: “I feel that the single gender environment has given her a level of confidence and informed interest in math and science that she may not have had otherwise.”
    School Dash research found that 75% of students that attend single-sex schools achieved at least 5 good GCSEs compared to the 55% of students that attend mixed schools
    Single sex schools enable girls and boys to feel free to learn and discover any subject, with girls able to pursue interest in male-dominated subjects such as maths and science and boys able to explore music and the arts. Indeed, at the 26 Girls’ Day School Trust schools and academies, girls are more than twice more likely to opt for science or engineering degrees at university level than girls nationally.

  • Girls can be anything even tufter than boys

    Girls want to do better and be faster than boys so they have started co-ed. To show that boys and girls have the same right that any boy has.
    Its not fair to let all the boys to have fun just like in the military girls can be in it too. Woman are just a powerful as men... I know i am im 14 and studding for the military NAVY / COST GUARD... People say that i cant ( BC im a girl) but if i can push then Im in

  • It's good being study separately with our own gender

    Being a girl I prefer to study separately. Some people think that we should study in a co school college or uni.... Because they want to grow up with confidence with developmental skills etc... I wanna tell them that I had studied with girls and boys too but I loved to study only with girls... I have confidence I am grown up with social skills I can go out and do everything which I want...

  • It's all about studies

    I believe a student, whether a girl or a boy should study in a school with students of their own gender. A stage of a student is that stage of life where innocence and craziness is in abundance. They can easily fall in wrong doings. It's better if they choose a school wherein the students are of same gender. They can compete, create, learn and contribute separately within their circles and hence became leaders . If it's a girl, she can provide a helping hand in women empowerment with her fellow girl classmates in every field and if a boy, he will provide massive technical, mechanical skills and business dealings with his fellow boy classmates in their future. Both, a girl and a boy can lead as examples in their own way and give rise to every aspect of worldly life .

  • Future related problems

    I think co-education is bad because if a boy and a girl gets a relation, it
    would cause a bad future for them. One more thing is that girls can easily cheat the boys who are very lonely and boys can also cheat the girls who are lonely. This can be related with money.

  • Future related problems

    I think co-education is bad because if a boy and a girl gets a relation, it
    would cause a bad future for them. One more thing is that girls can easily cheat the boys who are very lonely and boys can also cheat the girls who are lonely. This can be related with money.

  • My nephew remarked recently that in his GCSE computer science class there was just one girl among 29 boys. When I asked him why he thought that was, he replied that he saw nothing unusual – in his opinion computer science was simply a subject "for boys".

    This, and a recent visit to a London co-educational and a girls' school on the same day, showed me that many of my assumptions about what was good for girls had been utterly wrong.

    Far from being places of equal opportunity and preparation for the real world, even the best co-educational schools do not celebrate girls' achievements. Worse, girls continually struggle to get their voices heard amongst rowdy cajoling boys. The girls' school I visited, by comparison, was doing a much better job of overcoming gender stereotypes associated with STEM subjects.

    It was a temple to female achievement and had hallways festooned with images of high-achieving women. The school surrounds its girls with photos of female MPs, scientists and entrepreneurs. As a consequence the girls who attend are more likely to see themselves as future leaders.

    In an all female environment there's no reason to assume that subjects have gender: computing and science classes are all full of girls. It's not unseemly for a girl to imagine herself as a chemist, a primeminister, or possibly both.

    The second school I visited was co-educational. As a product of this kind of school myself, I had always believed that the co-ed system was better for girls: sharing classes with the boys is supposed to toughen us up for whatever struggles lie ahead.

    Part of this is true – coeducational schools are replete with real world problems – most noticeably the girls feel under the same kind of gender pressure that women do in working life. When girls are amongst boys they feel a greater compulsion to be feminine – often without even realising it.

    These stereotypes are impeding girls' achievements. Girls from single sex schools are almost two and a half times more likely to study physics at A-Level than girls who attend co-ed schools. The number of girls studying computing at A-Level this year decreased again from an already dismally low 297 to 245, just under 6.5% of the total number of students taking the subject.

    Co-educational schools show a kind of unintentional systematic bias. They teach a science and history curriculum which mainly emphasises the achievements of remarkable men. There are relatively few female protagonists in text-books - women represent just 27% of all central characters.

    This reflects the sad truth that for much of history, women have been relatively powerless and unimportant. It's hardly surprising that girls leave education with the notion that high achievement is not for them.

    One might argue that the girls-only school is teaching a biased version of history by over-emphasising women's contributions, but the reality is that history has created its own gender-bias.

    The last thing a self-conscious 13 year old girl needs is a biased view of the world, we need to celebrate the few female heroes that already exist, and uncover the ones that history has glossed over.

    I cannot help thinking of that lone girl in my nephew's computer science class. I imagine she must be brave and determined to study computing. It cannot be easy being the only girl in class.

    Lots of girls would like to do what she has chosen, but social pressure and competition with boys means that very few girls have the courage to follow their calling, especially if they are interested in 'geeky' subjects.

    The girls-school students are simply better off than her in one regard: they are free to choose to study what they want without anybody compelling them to conform to traditional roles. There are no boys (like my nephew) to innocently inform her that she's in the wrong classroom.

    It seems rather ironic that the easiest way to eliminate this gender bias from education is to segregate our children. But that's just a quick-fix - we need to work much harder to eliminate this kind of bias and celebrate female heroes within our co-educational schools. Girls will only be able to get a fair chance in life when the boys they study alongside see them as equals, and we're not there yet.

    Belinda Parmar is the founder of social enterprise Little Miss Geek which campaigns to celebrate female tech pioneers

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